Foster Application
Contact Information

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All Breed Rescue, Inc. (ABR) thanks you for your interest in this very rewarding effort of helping a homeless dog find a new home. Dogs that can be placed in a foster home have a better chance of a successful transition into its permanent home. Fostering also helps ABR conserve funds for other expenses such as boarding, food and vet care, etc. In order to assist both you and ABR to determine if you’re providing a foster home is likely to be successful, please review the following information and answer the following questions.

First, it is important to understand that dogs in this program come from a wide variety of situations. For example, sometimes the owner has died, other times the dog is a stray or is surrendered when the owner can no longer care for it, and many dogs are transported from high kill shelters in other parts of the country. As a result, dogs come into the ABR program with the potential for all sorts of issues – behavioral, medical and physical, etc. ABR will do it’s best to share with you all the information it has that ABR believes would be of significance to anyone providing foster care for that dog. However, please understand that ABR often does not have all the information itself. This being said, many wonderful, healthy and loving dogs come into the program.

ABR will provide the following if needed: collar, leash, crate, food and approved medical needs as laid out in the Foster Care Contract and Agreement.

The following are guidelines for foster parents:

1. Do not ever let a foster dog off its leash unless you are in a fenced area.

2. If you want more freedom for the foster dog than regular leashes provide, please use a 20-30’ leash or line.

3. Never leave a foster dog tied outside unattended

4. Introduce all new situations to the foster dog slowly until you are sure of the response, i.e. people, cats, other dogs, etc. The rule of thumb is to use caution and take precautions. That way no person or dog gets hurt.

5. Take special care with foster dogs near cats, other dogs or other pets as behaviors may be unexpected.

6. Never leave a foster dog “kenneled” with your own dogs without supervision.

7. Never leave the foster dog alone with other pets until you know for certain they are fine unsupervised.



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Being a foster home affects everyone in the household as well as a landlord – a spouse, partner, children, roommates and even visitors. A dog new to a foster home may cry at night, have an accident in the house, or be excitable, to name just a few behaviors.

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Being a foster home means making a commitment to the foster dog to provide regular feeding, exercise and positive attention. All three are necessary for a successful experience for the dog. ABR provides the foster home with the dog’s food and will cover all ABR approved medical needs laid out in the Foster Care Contract and Agreement.



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Being a foster home also means being able to transport the foster dog to Shelburne Veterinary Hospital in Shelburne for necessary medical treatments.



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